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Giuliano Giacaglia pfp
Giuliano Giacaglia
@giu
The European market versus the American market. They tracked and followed a similar path until 2010, but have diverged since then. My guess what happened was that there weren’t many important tech companies and the U.S. has produced most of the important tech companies. Any other theories of what happened?
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Kirby pfp
Kirby
@0xkirby
Europe too focused on regulation and bureaucracy while so much of its talent left for the US, it historically suffers from a huge brain drain which stifled its growth potential
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Uwe Cerron pfp
Uwe Cerron
@uwejenscerron
co-dependency on us rates
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Paul Lavers pfp
Paul Lavers
@paullavers.eth
Productivity and PE's expanding in the US while stagnating elsewhere, mainly because of US innovation.
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↑langchain 🎩  pfp
↑langchain 🎩
@langchain
Social media boom was centralized in US with follow-on effects for AI/silicon development. Remains to be seen if in the next booming cycle that the US will lead. Web2 success was a mix of poor policy & genuine interest/innovation + private capital
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Leo Nasskau
@lsn
This is fascinating in general, particularly for me. I was age 9 in 2009; a supercharged US market and sluggish Euro stocks has always felt like the norm to me, but it’s clearly a recent phenomenon I would guess the difference is the internet emergence of global platforms that benefitted from the large local market
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Fidel Ramos pfp
Fidel Ramos
@framos.eth
I'm only an armchair economist, but my instinct is that it relates to the Fed lowering interest rates earlier and lower than the ECB. That allowed US companies to take on free debt.
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